10 books about sport that every fan should read

As much as we know you’d like to spend every waking minute following plays and tallying points and yelling at the referee, there’s always some dead point during the weekend when there’s no sport on TV and the weather’s too poor to risk a kick-about outside – at which point, what better substitute activity than to read a rollicking novel about sport, eh?

The ad man guide to firing up your creativity

You’ve been working like a Duracell bunny all week on five different ad campaigns. Your Art Director has made your concepts look like bad expressionism and your Creative Director is questioning your copywriting talents with phrases like “did you go out drinking last night?” and “Maybe it was cool in the Eighties”. When the weekend arrives it feels like you’ve jumped aboard a lifeboat.

The 15 laws of literary life every writer should know

If you're not a writer, you probably have a certain perception of literary life. Take Hollywood. It just loves to portray the drink and drug addled escapades of wild writers like Hemingway, Hunter S. Thompson and Truman Capote. Sadly, or happily, depending upon your liver, the truth is a little more mundane. Here's 15 universal truths, which I've unearthed from half a dozen years' banging at keys and gazing at a flickering cursor.

The 19th century’s greatest writers as you’ve never seen them before. In colour.

When most of us picture the past we imagine it in black and white. Hardly surprising when you consider the history of colour photography. Although the first colour photograph was taken way back in 1861 by Thomas Sutton (the Englishman choose a tartan ribbon as his subject), it wasn't until the 1970s that colour snaps became everyday. Consequently, colourizing photos is the only way we can closer to our fantastic ancestors.