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Disruptive Decades: Technologies that revolutionised the 1920s

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In 1928, Otto Frederick Rohwedder gave the world the invention that all future inventions would be cheekily compared to: sliced bread. His revolutionary bread-slicing machine made such an impact that it inspired the popular idiom “the best thing since sliced bread”, which we still use even today. Despite the idiom, we aren’t quite as impressed these days by sliced bread — however, it’s still an apt example of the many inventions that not only defined one of the 20th century’s most dynamic decades but revolutionised the world.

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A short history of refined carbs every Finn needs to read

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Ancestral health

Global cooling around the last modern ice age, 2.5 million years ago, meant early humans found fruits and vegetables scarcer to find and helped bring about the adaption of hunting and gathering. This more than anything else evolved our bodies via natural selection to be the way they are today. Archaeology shows early humans learnt to control fire about one million years ago and cooking sites appear frequently around 400,000 years ago. Cooking food enabled us to obtain enough energy to evolve our uniquely large brains and distinguish ourselves from other species through intelligence.

Fossil records show hunter­-gatherers were tall, healthy, and with little tooth decay. When not killed by another human or animal, they had a good chance of living into their 7th decade. Just 200,000 years ago, modern humans evolved as hunter-­gatherers, eating wild animals for fat and protein with staples of fruit, vegetables, nuts and seeds. The human genome has changed little since. Instead, Cultural Evolution has taken over as the dominant factor of change.

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7 reasons why Isaac Asimov is the greatest science fiction writer ever

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Science fiction is one of those literary genres that is both loved and hated in equal measure. For its detractors, it’s all silly silver suits and bug-eyed monsters, for its enthusiasts, it provides a fascinating insight into humanity and a myriad of potential tech fuelled futures. We fall firmly into the second category and one very big reason for that is Isaac Asimov, a man who opened our eyes to the wonders of science and space at a very young age. This is one reason we believe, that despite being up against a legion of fantastic sci-fi writers including the legendary Arthur C. Clarke and Robert Heinlein, Asimov is the greatest ever.

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40 websites that’ll make you cleverer right now

The indexed web contains an incredible 14 billion pages. But only a tiny fraction help you improve your brain power. Here are 40 of the best.

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whizzpast.com – Learn about our awe inspiring past all in one wonderful place.

khanacademy.org – Watch thousands of micro-lectures on topics ranging from history and medicine to chemistry and computer science.

freerice.com – Help end world hunger by correctly answering multiple-choice quizzes on a wide variety of subjects.

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5 fascinating facts you didn’t know about Albert Einstein


What do we really know about Albert Einstein? Hair that would stump Vidal Sassoon, a lab coat that’s seen better days, a very complicated set of theories that, oh, revolutionised the way we think about time and space and just about everything – sure. But there’s more to a genius than grooming and publications. Here’s 5 facts about Albert Einstein you probably didn’t know.

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The 37 most astounding facts about sex you’ll ever read

1. Cleopatra is credited with the invention of the vibrator. She is said to have taken insects and placed them inside a hollow sphere. The insects would become agitated and begin buzzing around, causing the sphere to vibrate.

2. The clitoris extends 9cm under the skin.

3. French bulldogs cannot reproduce naturally because they are too top heavy. Every French bulldog puppy is born of artificial insemination.

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