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Flow Festival sign, photo by Samuli Pentti

14 reasons why Helsinki’s Flow Festival is terrible and must be avoided

Flow Festival sign, photo by Samuli Pentti

Helsinki based Flow Festival has established itself as one of Europe’s most praised music festivals. With ringing endorsements from publications like The Guardian and The Consequence of Sound, you’d think Flow would be one of those experiences you should try and have.

None of the above is true,. Flow Festival 2017 (August 11-13) is terrible and we’ll explain why.
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Everyday life in the capital: 19th century Helsinki, in pics

Helsinki experienced massive growth after it became Finland’s capital in 1812. As the new economic and cultural center, its population exploded, architecture grew quickly, and technology flourished. But what did it look like? Let’s take a stroll through 19th century Helsinki, courtesy of the Helsinki City Museum’s vast database of photos from the late 1800s.

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No sunburn: 12 upsides of terrible Finnish summer weather

Eastern Pasila, Helsinki in grey June weather, 2014

Here in Finland, summer is highly anticipated as a time for restoring sanity after months and months of bleak, terrible fall, winter and no spring to speak of. However, the weather of June, July and August just doesn’t always add up to what one would expect of a great summer.

Luckily, there are upsides to everything. In theory, at least. Let’s explore some of the, well, arguably sunny side of bad Finnish summers.

 

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Finnish welcome sign

Why Finland bans the weirdest things

"Tervetuloa", Finnish welcome sign

 

Somewhere along the line, someone figured out a great job for themselves: Ban things. It doesn´t matter what, just think of something for whatever reason you happen to think of at the moment. It´s a convenient way to make yourself seem important, and have an actual impact on the world. Not to mention banning things is way easier than suggesting constructive ideas and improvements on society.

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Midsummer sunset in Finnish lake landscape

Isn’t it dreamy? Save your rainy day with stunning photos of Finnish lakeside midsummer sunsets

Midsummer sunset in Finnish lake landscape

When Finnish summer weather disappoints, there’s always pictures and the internet. We were contacted by young photographer Markus Watkins, whom we interviewed earlier this year, about his fun collection of summery activities shot in winter landscapes.

Markus wanted to share another set of his with our readers. Since the sky is grey at the time of writing, we can’t think of a single reason why we should turn down this set.

Scroll down for Markus’ dreamlike lakeside shots featuring the legendary Finnish midsummer almost-sunset.

We also suggest you read our interview, if you’re not already familiar with Markus’ work. You can also follow Markus on Instagram.

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Very Finnish Problems Episode 4: When your winter stroll is ruined by an arriving icebreaker

What’s the weirdest place Finnish president Urho Kekkonen went fishing? Author Joel Willans is joined by maritime historian Aaro Sahari. The two discuss icebreaker ships and their impact on Finnish 20th century industrialization. Aaro explains how conquering nature with year-round open waterways affected Finnish national pride.

Contact: veryfinnishproblems@inktank.fi

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

Shownotes:

Old footage with fearless strolling next to speeding icebreaker

Mr. Sahari’s academic record

Sahari & Matala: Small nation, big ships winter navigation and technological nationalism in a peripheral country, 1878–1978 (paywall)

Mr. Sahari’s popularized article on icebreakers (in Finnish)

Finnish Funding Agency TEKES makes video campaign with self-mutilating daredevils group Dudesons

Joel Willans with maritime historian Aaro Sahari

Joel Willans with maritime historian Aaro Sahari

 

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You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

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About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.
Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter




alcohol forbidden sign

Very Finnish Problems Episode 3: When alcohol is an excuse to go insane

alcohol forbidden sign

Who can name the worst Finnish booze? Helsinki resident Joel Willans reads from his upcoming book “101 Very Finnish Problems: The Foreigner’s Guide to Surviving Finland”, and spills the beans on annoying Finnish alcohol laws. Ink Tank writer Thomas Nybergh chimes in with his hazy understanding of deterministic, genetic explanations of alcoholism.

Contact: veryfinnishproblems@inktank.fi

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

Shownotes:

Finnish alcohol related gene mutation

 

Download or subscribe

You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

Apple Podcasts / Soundcloud / Stitcher / TuneIn / AcastGoogle Play / RSS

 

About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.

Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter




Title photo by Ilkka Jukarainen

Ihana kesä! The history of hot Helsinki summers, in pics

Finnish summers are short and sweet, but they sure can be spectacular! It’s important to enjoy every single second of them before the long dark winter comes once again. In Finland, summer appreciation has been turned into an art form — nobody soaks up the sun like the Finns do.

Need some proof? Just take a look at these historical photos of Finns loving the Helsinki summer. Take notes, because you just might learn a thing or two.

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