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More than sauna: The 6 most Finnish things to do in your 20s

The general interests of 20-somethings seem somewhat universal. Depending on location, though, the expression of these preferences often vary.

Finland is a small country and has a challenging climate (unless you’re very much into skiing), so young people have gotten creative. From adventurous spots for lovemaking to becoming an internet sensation overnight, here are ideas how to spend your 20s the Finnish way.
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12 wonderful ways Finland could be an even more amazing country

12 ways Helsinki could be an even more amazing city

My name is Marc Aulén. I’m 52 years of age, the father of two, and I’ve lived in Helsinki, Finland since I was 13. As a partner in a lunch restaurant, I run a tiny, meals-on-wheels business and wrote and published a book in Finnish featuring my best soup recipes in 2014 (I’m the soup guy).

Marc AulenI’m currently working on a new book project with my business partner and friend, Antti Lehto, my awesome photo guy Mr. Jaeseong Park, and three very talented graphic designers. Our aim is to simply to show a different view of our hometown to visitors. Most guide books for tourists, and not only in Finland, only blow sunshine up your bottom, painting pretty pictures with fluttering bluebirds and everyone in love. For some strange reason, these books also usually only recommend expensive fine-dining restaurants and designer shops. Nothing wrong with that, but we want to reach normal people with normal travel budgets. Which is why we’d like to offer a guide book that’s more down to earth. The book will contain lists of my best picks of everything from bars to beaches.

To celebrate its forthcoming publication, my buddy, award-winning author, Co-founder of Ink Tank Media and funny guy, Joel Willans, asked me to write a few lines on Ink Tank. The challenge was to show how I see Finland and Helsinki as a local, mentioning both the good and the bad, and how I would change things if I could. So, here goes.

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These haunting pictures will help you understand Finnish loneliness

We’ve arrived at the time of the year when us Finns hibernate in our homes. Summer is for having fun with friends, winter is for closing the doors and listening to your morbid thoughts, perhaps interspersed by the odd melancholic Schlager. It’s too dark outside to see anyone anyway, so why bother trying?

Ghost bridge

Ghost bridge

Fortunately, for many of us, this hibernation is self-imposed, but according to research, one in ten Finns suffers from chronic loneliness. While Finnish people don’t consider themselves any more lonely than their Southern European counterparts, their loneliness more often includes poverty, alcoholism and depression. Professor Nina Junttila from the University of Turku sees this as a result of weaker inter-family relationships. “In Spain and Italy, for example, relatives are very close. In Finland, family bonds are weak and people tend to seek help from friends. Those who have no friends will be left out,” she recently told the Kodin Kuvalehti women’s magazine.

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