Nigel Farage having a drink in 2017

The Misled Pleb: The 34 best pub names for Brexit Britain will leave you thristy for a beer

Nigel Farage having a drink in 2017

It’s impossible to miss that Great Britain loves its pubs. A lot of personality of a neighborhood, town or the owner of an establishment can be expressed in the form of a name.

Since the Brits are about to embark on a great mission to isolate themselves, what better way tp take back ownership of the country than to name pubs in Brexit’s dubious honor? None, we think.

The good folks of Twitter came up with some fantastic suggestion under the #SuggestNamesForABrexiteerPub hashtag.

 

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Title image by Steve Bowbrick

Very Finnish Problems Episode 6: When your children need to wee after getting dressed for winter

Young children playing in the snow

Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems and author of the best-selling book 101 Very Finnish Problems, chats with clothing industry activist and sci-fi writer Rinna Saramäki about the evils of the clothing industry. Thomas Nybergh, co-host and producer of the show, is skeptical about ethical consumerism and likes his sci-fi bleak and dystopian.

Contact: veryfinnishproblems@inktank.fi

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

 
Shownotes:

Rinna’s blog (in Finnish)

Rinna’s books (in Finnish)

Why ethical consumerism isn’t enough

Rinna’s book pick: Emmi Itäranta’s critically acclaimed “Memory of Water” (Teemestarin kirja)

Joel’s book pick: “The Day of the Triffids” by John Wyndham

Rinna didn’t like the movie adaptation of “Valérian and Laureline”

What does “Jumping the Shark” mean?

New York Times’ Review of Thomas’ dystopian book pick, P.C. Jersild’s “After the flood”. Jersild’s “A Living Soul” is also awesome.

Joel’s pick: “Z for Zachariah” by Robert C. O’Brien

Rinna’s pick: “The Windup Girl” by Paolo Bacigalupi

Worldcon 75 took place in Helsinki this year

Kuoriaiskirjat, a cool small Finnish book publisher

Osuuskumma, another cool small publisher of fine Finnish fiction. Some books translated to English and Spanish

Joel Willans with clothing industry activist and Finnish sci-fi author Rinna Saramäki

Joel Willans with Finnish clothing industry activist and sci-fi author Rinna Saramäki.

 

Download or subscribe

You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

Apple Podcasts / Soundcloud / Stitcher / TuneIn / AcastGoogle Play / RSS

 

About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.

Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter




Title photo by Honza Soukup

11 wonderful ways the internet lampooned Theresa May’s latest speech about Brexit

Today British Prime Minister Theresa May tried to set out an upbeat vision for Britain’s future relationship with the EU in a speech at the Santa Maria Novella church in the heart of Florence, Italy. Sadly, the internet wasn’t quite as enthusiastic as she’d hoped about her new “have your cake and eat it” proposals.

Read more

Ruska relief: 35 stunning photos of Finland’s autumn colors

Yellow autumn leaf on the ground, photo by Tom Woodward

Finland’s climate is notorious for skipping long intermediary periods of warmish spring and fall. Summer turns to… something else pretty quickly. That somefthing else usually happens in September, in Finnish literally “Month of Autumn” (syyskuu).

If you’re out and about in Finnish nature during late September throughout most of October, you might witness ruska. That’s a Finnish word for autumn colored foliage. In many places over the world, ruska puts up quite the show.

But due to the long, dark winter in Finland, ruska really is last call for enjoying nature. Unless you like stumbling around in the cold and dark. Which is totally okay, we’re not judging.

In any case, we went scouting Flickr’s community for some ruska goodness. This writer also pillaged his own archive if Instagram snapshots, for your enjoyment. So, whether you prefer the great outdoors in urban streetscapes or out in the middle of nowhere, we hope we can remind you to at least enjoy a few more strolls outside before the long grey dark sets in.

 

1. If you’re in luck puddles or lakes might remind you to look up at the trees.

 

 

2. Lapland is stunning during ruska.

 

3. But so are all the lush suburbs all around the country. This view is from a high-rise building in Vuosaari in Helsinki.

 

4. I prefer staying in my inner city hoods, around Kallio and Vallila. But not because of some pretense of hipness…

 

5. …but because it’s going to retain a sense of place when ruska is over and fall is at its worst.

 
 

 
 

6. To each their own. But the point is: nature lovers, don’t waste a minute of this.

 

7. Anyway, you can’t get this in the cities.

 

8. However, nothing will stop you from enjoying wild cloud formations wherever you can see the sky.

 

9. Seriously, these skies are quite something.

 
 

 
 

10. Let’s cut the BS though, we were talking about autumn colors, ruska.

 

11. Again, available wherever they haven’t cut down the trees.

 

12. Autumn colors are caused by the process during which chlorophyll levels decrease in leaves.

 

13. Chlorophyll, the bringer of greenery, and an essential component of photosynthesis, is replaced by cork cells as sunlight and wamth decreases.

 

14. Eventually leaves drop. Without photosynthesis, they’re redundant. So, unless you have matching facades, get your nice photos taken while the leaves haven’t yet fallen.

 
 

 
 

15. Eventually, the end result is this: naked trees, with leaves in a slowly decomposing brown mess.

 

16. Luckily, some trees stay green.

 

17. So, if you notice moments post August 15 that pass for summer, be mindful and savor them.

 

18. One week, you’ll be out and about and enjoying everything about your surroundings.

 

19. Then, it’ll suddenly get rainy, in a way that just feels chilling.

 

20. And before you know it, you’ll just forget to enjoy your everyday surroundings. Moving outdoors becomes a tiresome chore, one which requires preparation.

 
 

 
 

21. Sure, those August and September sunsets are quite something.

 

22. They almost make you appreciate the looming darkness.

 

23. But by early November, a handful of pretty sunsets are among the few outposts of sanity you’ll have left. In Helsinki, you’ll miss the show if you don’t leave work between 4 and 5 pm. Farther up north, any typical office gig will leave you out of daylight.

 

24. With my brain chemistry, only something like this furball can force me to leave the house while there’s light around noon on November weekends.

 

25. But of course, outdoorsy people will crawl the forests for some last edible berries or mushrooms.

 

26. Or they’ll be using their inexplicable energy, to take some last sips of whatever magic takes place at summer cottages.

 
 

 
 

27. Make no mistake, to take a photo like this, you’ll need to get our in the middle of nowhere and be prepared for the freezing cold as soon as you’re not in direct sunlight.

 

28. Here, a regular human just sees a weird big rock, maybe with some understanding that the ice age dragged it there. Outdoorsy folks probably measure it up as potential shelter or whatever.

 

29. Personally, I prefer everyday scenes like these, and muttering about things like ugly elevated highway bridges.

 

30. Luckily I can get dramatic shots like this one just a fifteen minute walk away from my house.

 

31. Again, with the clouds.

 
 

 
 

32. And I much prefer to spend the silver hour on my way home.

 

33. When darkness falls, I want to be real close to home.

 

34. This is the kind of nature sightings I like in fall: old NYC style taxis with campaign stickers for Dick Nixon.

 

35. Anyway, time to head out before everything looks like this.

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more stories about super Suomi

 

Thomas Nybergh is a writer and producer for Ink Tank Media in Helsinki. He’s really into topics like information security, but he writes about anything. Occasionally, Thomas gets around to sharing photos on Instagram.

Thomas also co-hosts and produces a podcast based on Very Finnish Problems, the social media sensation.




Title image by Tom Woodward

4 reasons why Finland’s lagging behind in electric car adoption and why that’s all set to change

Electric vehicles, EVs, were invented nearly two centuries ago. Hungarian priest and engineer Ányos Jedlik, created the electric motor in 1828.

You’d think then that these cleaner and more energy efficient vehicles would have already taken the world by storm. Indeed, in some places they have. Norway, for example, peaked with over half of new cars sold being EV or hybrids in early 2017.
Read more

The foreigner’s guide to surviving your first Finnish sauna

 

There are more saunas than cars in Finland. In fact, Finn’s love is so great there’s probably even saunas made from cars. Consequently, if you’re a visitor or a recent arrival, you’ll need to give sauna a go. That’s the unwritten law and if you ignore it you risk suspicious stares at best, the silent treatment at worse, (and Finnish silent treatment can last for years). Happily, help is at hand in the form of this handy guide I’ve put together to ensure your first time is one to remember for all the right reasons.

Read more

Daily Fail: 22 vicious anti-Brexit memes to pave your road to isolationism

Tintin and The Brexit Plan: Captain Haddock burning oars and warming his hands in a liferaft

What if we told you there’s this place on the interweb you can go to receive regular updates of the latest, most vicious anti-Brexit memes? Well there is, over at the Twitters, under the account @SoVeryBrexit, or Very Brexit Problems. You can also find the same dank political misery over at Facebook, if that’s your thing.

Read more

Earbud Weltschmerz: 13 excellent podcasts to help you understand our troubled times

It’d be nice to live on a non-ruined planet, in peace. If your line of thinking also includes a scientific worldview and questions on how to balance labor cost with wealth redistribution in a globalized world, you’re probably one of us forward thinking people. And we want to stay informed.

Newsflash: powerful people want turn back the clock on social issues, ignore the limits of our natural resources and, at their worst, create closed, authoritarian oligarchies. In the Anglosphere, Brexit and that historically unstable clown in the White House make the news intolareble. Read more

The internet loved Finnish President Niinistö’s press conference with Trump. Here’s why.

Yesterday, Finnish President Sauli Niinistö met with Donald Trump. When it comes to meeting with the world’s most powerful leaders Niinistö has been on something of a roll this year, having already spent time with Xi Jinping, Vladimir Putin. The Finnish press also got excited by the fact that the only other Finnish president to get an official invitation to the White House was the legendary Urho Kekkonen. However, what excited the internet more was the series of blunders Trump notched up at their press conference. Some even believed they were some of his greatest ever. Have a look to see for yourself.

Read more

Finnish made Kone elevator

Very Finnish Problems Episode 5: When somebody else is in the lift

Finnish made Kone elevator

How does elevator awkwardness in Britain differ from the same in Finland? Joel Willans, author of Very Finnish Problems, asks game studies Ph.D. Aki Järvinen essential questions about migrating to the UK. Co-host Thomas Nybergh is curious about the demoscene and where fake money used inside video games ends up.

Contact: veryfinnishproblems@inktank.fi

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

 
Shownotes:

Aki on Twitter

Elevators and how they impacted culture

Finnish chapter of IGDA, the International Game Developers Association

The Assembly demoparty

Example of a demo

Journalist Anni Lassila on how cool summers are becoming a privilege

Joel Willans with game studies Ph.D. Aki Järvinen

Joel Willans with game studies Ph.D. Aki Järvinen

 

Download or subscribe

You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

Apple Podcasts / Soundcloud / Stitcher / TuneIn / AcastGoogle Play / RSS

 

About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.

Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter




Title photo by Andrés Moreno