Finnish made Kone elevator

Very Finnish Problems Episode 5: When somebody else is in the lift

Finnish made Kone elevator

How does elevator awkwardness in Britain differ from the same in Finland? Joel Willans, author of Very Finnish Problems, asks game studies Ph.D. Aki Järvinen essential questions about migrating to the UK. Co-host Thomas Nybergh is curious about the demoscene and where fake money used inside video games ends up.

Contact: [email protected]

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

 

 

Shownotes:

Aki on Twitter

Elevators and how they impacted culture

Finnish chapter of IGDA, the International Game Developers Association

The Assembly demoparty

Example of a demo

Journalist Anni Lassila on how cool summers are becoming a privilege

Joel Willans with game studies Ph.D. Aki Järvinen

Joel Willans with game studies Ph.D. Aki Järvinen

 

 
 

Download or subscribe

You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

Apple Podcasts / Soundcloud / Stitcher / TuneIn / AcastGoogle Play / RSS

 

About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.

Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Title photo by Andrés Moreno

Absolutely Socking: Finnish FB group against human rights gets flooded with socks

Dirty socks on a pair of sneakers, presumably not related to the xenophobia in Finland following the Turku knife stabbing attack

Note: the reporting on a nazi group being flooded with pics of socks is incorrect. In fact, this involves a parody group. For a for complete statement, with corrections, please see Jaakko’s feedback in the comments section of this article (scroll way down). This article will remain otherwise unchanged, as we think it contains commentary on the opportunist nature of how the political aftermath of the Turku incident is playing out. As always, please let us know about factual problems in our writing.

Turku, Finland’s sixth largest and oldest city, experienced a deadly, Islamism-related act of terrorism last week. You might ask yourself what this has to do with socks and a Facebook hate group. Let’s find out.

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Flow Festival sign, photo by Samuli Pentti

14 reasons why Helsinki’s Flow Festival is terrible and must be avoided

Flow Festival sign, photo by Samuli Pentti

Helsinki based Flow Festival has established itself as one of Europe’s most praised music festivals. With ringing endorsements from publications like The Guardian and The Consequence of Sound, you’d think Flow would be one of those experiences you should try and have.

None of the above is true,. Flow Festival 2017 (August 11-13) is terrible and we’ll explain why.
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Everyday life in the capital: 19th century Helsinki, in pics

Helsinki experienced massive growth after it became Finland’s capital in 1812. As the new economic and cultural center, its population exploded, architecture grew quickly, and technology flourished. But what did it look like? Let’s take a stroll through 19th century Helsinki, courtesy of the Helsinki City Museum’s vast database of photos from the late 1800s.

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That’s a MiniDisc: 14 Finnish music videos that will make you feel old

Screenshot from Darude's Sandstorm video

Do you know that sinking feeling of realizing that time flies and you’re older than you think? Yeah, we do too, and honeslty, it’s like a fun roller coaster ride. In light of this universal feeling, we’ve collected a bunch of Finnish pop tunes you might remember from the past two decades (!).

If you’ve grown up in Finland as a millennial, you might have associated these tracks with everything slick and international. See, there was a time when convincing Finnish pop in English was a shiny new thing. Chances are you will remember these tunes like yesterday. But once you look closer at their accompanying videos, they will feel as dated as you secretly know you are yourself.

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No sunburn: 12 upsides of terrible Finnish summer weather

Eastern Pasila, Helsinki in grey June weather, 2014

Here in Finland, summer is highly anticipated as a time for restoring sanity after months and months of bleak, terrible fall, winter and no spring to speak of. However, the weather of June, July and August just doesn’t always add up to what one would expect of a great summer.

Luckily, there are upsides to everything. In theory, at least. Let’s explore some of the, well, arguably sunny side of bad Finnish summers.

 

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Finnish welcome sign

Why Finland bans the weirdest things

"Tervetuloa", Finnish welcome sign

 

Somewhere along the line, someone figured out a great job for themselves: Ban things. It doesn´t matter what, just think of something for whatever reason you happen to think of at the moment. It´s a convenient way to make yourself seem important, and have an actual impact on the world. Not to mention banning things is way easier than suggesting constructive ideas and improvements on society.

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Midsummer sunset in Finnish lake landscape

Isn’t it dreamy? Save your rainy day with stunning photos of Finnish lakeside midsummer sunsets

Midsummer sunset in Finnish lake landscape

When Finnish summer weather disappoints, there’s always pictures and the internet. We were contacted by young photographer Markus Watkins, whom we interviewed earlier this year, about his fun collection of summery activities shot in winter landscapes.

Markus wanted to share another set of his with our readers. Since the sky is grey at the time of writing, we can’t think of a single reason why we should turn down this set.

Scroll down for Markus’ dreamlike lakeside shots featuring the legendary Finnish midsummer almost-sunset.

We also suggest you read our interview, if you’re not already familiar with Markus’ work. You can also follow Markus on Instagram.

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Very Finnish Problems Episode 4: When your winter stroll is ruined by an arriving icebreaker

What’s the weirdest place Finnish president Urho Kekkonen went fishing? Author Joel Willans is joined by maritime historian Aaro Sahari. The two discuss icebreaker ships and their impact on Finnish 20th century industrialization. Aaro explains how conquering nature with year-round open waterways affected Finnish national pride.

Contact: [email protected]

Produced by Thomas Nybergh / Ink Tank Media

 

 

 

Shownotes:

Old footage with fearless strolling next to speeding icebreaker

Aaro’s academic record

Sahari & Matala: Small nation, big ships winter navigation and technological nationalism in a peripheral country, 1878–1978 (paywall)

Aaro’s popularized article on icebreakers (in Finnish)

Finnish Funding Agency TEKES makes video campaign with self-mutilating daredevils group Dudesons

Joel Willans with maritime historian Aaro Sahari

Joel Willans with maritime historian Aaro Sahari

 

Download or subscribe

You can get the show as a direct download.

Get all new episodes automatically by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.

Apple Podcasts / Soundcloud / Stitcher / TuneIn / AcastGoogle Play / RSS

 

 
 

About the show

What’s so weird and wonderful about Finland? British born Joel Willans, creator of Very Finnish Problems, discusses, with a variety of fascinating guests, what he’s learnt after 15 years living in his much-loved, adopted country.
Follow Very Finnish Problems to get all our stuff.

Facebook / Instagram / Twitter