Fab Finland: 10 Finnish Eurovision songs that should have won

Eurovision_Song_Contest_1976_-_Fredi_&_Friends

Love it or hate it, Eurovision is back in all its kitsch glory. Finland’s Sandhja may already be out of the running, but the show must go on! So, as we eagerly wait to see who’ll be crowned this year’s winner, let’s take a trip down Eurovision memory lane and celebrate great Finnish contestants of yesteryear. Lordi maybe Finland’s only victor, but we think each and every one of these showcased songsters deserves a prize too. Crank up the volume, put on your dancing shoes and we’ll tell you why.




1. “Tipi-tii”, Marion Rung (1962)

“Tipi-Tii” (“Chirpy-Chirp”) is a catchy classic that deserved much better than the 7th place it received. The upbeat flute work and swinging 60s style alone make this a winner in our eyes. (Disclaimer: Once you hear this it will stay in your head forever. You have been warned.)

2. “Aurinko laskee länteen”, Viktor Klimenko (1965)

How is it possible that Viktor Klimenko was awarded a grand total of zero points for this song? His voice is beautiful, the music is lovely, and he even looks a bit like Abraham Lincoln. It definitely deserved better than the last place it received.

3. “Tie uuteen päivään”, Markku Aro & Koivistolaiset (1971)

A song with a positive message, coordinated outfits in shades of brown, and subtle but smooth dance moves — what more could you ask for? Sadly, “Tie uuteen päivään” only made it to 8th place.

4. “Tom Tom Tom”, Marion Rung (1973)

Marion Rung returned after her 1962 performance of “Tipi-tii” to give viewers “Tom Tom Tom”. The song was Finland’s most successful entry until Lordi’s win in 2006. Rung earned 6th place with “Tom Tom Tom”, but with it’s insanely catching, clappy-happy chorus it will always be first in our hearts.

5. “Old Man Fiddle”, Pihasoittajat (1975)

You probably don’t expect to hear bluegrass-inspired music coming from Finland, but Pihasoittajat proved it can be done, and done well. This country and western tune gets our toes tapping, but voters didn’t agree (although it did make it to 7th place).




6. “Pump-Pump”, Fredi & Ystävät (1976)

In any other year, this would’ve had winner all over it. It’s Eurovision in a nutshell! “Pump-Pump” is fun and catchy, the costumes are full of 70s glitz and glamour, and the dancing is impeccable. Unfortunately, it lost out to the UK’s even catchier “Save all your kisses for me” by the Brotherhood of Man. It may have only gotten 11th place, but we’ve no doubt there are plenty of people happily humming it since 1976.

7. “Huilumies”, Vesa-Matti Loiri (1980)

Controversial opinion? We don’t care. We love everything about “Huilumies”.

8. “Reggae OK”, Riki Sorsa (1981)

If you don’t have a smile on your face by the end of this song, you have a cold, cold heart. Riki Sorsa’s enthusiasm is undeniable and the song is pure enjoyment. One of Finland’s greatest, who sadly died recently, Riki wins not just with this tune, but with the stunning outfit too.

9. “Fri?”, Beat (1990)

“Fri?”, Finland’s first song sung in Swedish, has everything it takes to make a hit. Add to that the groups big frizzy hair, matching outfits, and coordinated dance moves, and we can only wonder why it placed second to last. For us, it wins the award for the biggest shoulder pads, hands down




10. “Yamma, yamma”, Pave Maijanen (1992)

One of the most underrated Eurovision songs of all time, “Yamma, yamma” took last place in 1992. We do wonder whether the group were overly penalized for the backing singers banana yellow outfits. In our opinion, it’s terrible score simply underlines that, as usual, Finland was well ahead of the musical curve.

Well, there you have it. Our top 10 favourite Finnish Eurovision entries, that in our opinion, deserved a ton more love. Happily, regardless of their eventual scrore, they’ll always be winners for us. But what about you?  Do you agree with our choices? Let us know in the comments below if we’ve missed a famous Finnish song, which rocked your Eurovision world.




8 replies
  1. Diane
    Diane says:

    Who is Ossi Runne and why is he leading orchestras in nearly all of these? Also, went did orchestras go out of style?

    Reply
    • Joel Willans
      Joel Willans says:

      There are so many reasons to love that tune. Unfortunately, it so catchy I know that it will never, ever leave my head.

      Reply

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